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Theme (mostly) by: Theme Static

"My basic theme is the image of the universe operation that has repeated the circulating generation (life) and dismantlement (death)."

diett-cokehead:

Nunzio Paci

“My whole work deals with the relationship between man and Nature, in particular with animals and plants. The focus of my observation is body with its mutations. My intention is to explore the infinite possibilities of life, in search of a balance between reality and imagination.”

Mia-Jane Harris - from the collection “Your Corpse is Beautiful”
Macro photography of human cadavers.

Lightning strike at the erupting Grímsvötn Volcano, Iceland. Jóhann Ingi Jónsson

astronomicalwonders:

Cassini RADAR view of Titan’s north pole

This mosaic is composed of all synthetic-aperture-radar maps of Titan’s polar regions acquired by Cassini to date. It has been cropped and reduced in size by 50% from an even larger mosaic available on NASA’s Planetary Photojournal. Approximately 60 percent of Titan’s northern polar region (poleward of 60 degrees north latitude) has been mapped as of October 2007, and of this area, about 14% appears to be covered with hydrocarbon lakes. The radar images are grayscale; they have been colored here with a color map that applies blue colors to the materials that are darkest to the RADAR instrument, and yellow colors to the materials that are brightest. This color scheme highlights the apparent lakes, but also shows that many lake-like features are not as dark as other lakes, and that darker channels appear to run down the interiors of less dark lakes.

The image is a polar projection, with zero longitude (the sub-Saturnian hemisphere) toward the bottom. The leading hemisphere (centered at 90 degrees W) is to the left, and the trailing hemisphere (centered at 270 degrees W) is to the right. The largest lakes are clustered in an area on Titan’s trailing hemisphere.

NASA / JPL-Caltech

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

The Sculpture of Norwegian artist tChristopher Conte

Christopher Conte began working in the prosthetics field making artificial limbs for amputees for 16 years. Throughout his time, he worked in obscurity creating biomechanical sculptures which reflected his love for biomechanics, anatomy and robotics. In June 2008, he left the field to begin his career as a full-time artist. Christopher uses a wide range of experience along with diverse materials and construction techniques to create one-of-a-kind arthropods and anatomies.